Milton Alfred Lister Crawshaw

(1912—2016)





 BORN 22 December 1912 over shop at 624 Darling St, Rozelle, NSW.
 Data 

NSW Birth Record 1509/1913.

KRAUSHAAR ALFRED M
CONRAD & FANNY I
@ BALMAIN SOUTH.
 
 DIED 1 January 2016 in Sydney.
 BURIED 11 January 2016 in Macquarie Park Cemetery.
 
 FATHER Conrad Kraushaar (1885-1966)
 MOTHER Fanny Ina Lister (1883-1961)
 
 MARRIED Edith Mary Johnston (1923-2017) on 6 November 1943 at North Sydney, NSW
 Data 

NSW Marriage Record 24144/1943.

CRAWSHAW ALFRED MILTON LISTER &
JOHNSTON EDITH  MARY
@ NORTH SYDNEY.
 

 CHILDREN   Stephen James Crawshaw
Timothy Milton Crawshaw
John Conrad Crawshaw
Mary Anne Crawshaw


♦♦♦


Born Alfred Milton Lister Kraushaar; surname changed, effectively but never officially, during WW I.

Said to have been named after Milton Tom because Fanny Ina admired Milton Tom.

Pharmacist, 165 Sailors Bay Rd Northbridge, from age 17.

In 2011 MALC wrote:

I spent most of 1930 working full time (9am to 6pm) in the shop, and I used to commute between Lane Cove West and Northbridge by bicycle.

Throughout 1931 and 1932, I had to attend Syd Univ from 9am to 1pm 5 days per week, and be back at the shop by 2pm. I used to ride to NB in the early morning, leave the bike at the back of the shop, and catch a tram to Milsons Pt, then a ferry to the Quay, then another tram to the Uni. It was the time of deep depression, and money was scarce, and valuable. I think the fare was tuppence from Northbridge to the ferry, and the same for the ferry ride, and the second tram. Coming back, I would leave the tram at Hunter St and walk to Elliott Bros in O’Connell St, and ask at the order room whether there anything for Northbridge Pharmacy. Then I used walk to Macquarie Place, where was a beaut little Park, and there I would have my lunch. Then to the Quay, and back to the shop until 6pm, and then pedal home.

Every day I would survey the work on the Bridge. There was a constant rat-a-tat-tat of the riveters. They built it from both ends, and the big question arose whether the ends would meet. I believe it was only a few inches out!

When I was registered at 21, Carter asked me to become a partner, but I told him I could not be yoked with an unbeliever (2 Cor 14). So we arranged that he would retire, we would splash Under new management on the front, and I would work for half the profits. He was still the proprietor. I continued in that arrangement for many years, but when the war came I told him I wanted him out. So in about 1941, I bought him out.



Wedding, 1943.