Alfred Kraushaar

(1860—1945)





 BORN 13 September 1860 at Ketton, Rutland, England.
 DIED 24 October 1945 at 8 Helen St, Lane Cove, NSW, of Gastroenteritis 1 day, Senility 2 years. 
 Data 

NSW Death Record 23884/1945

KRAUZBARR ALFRED
JOHN LEECH &…
@ CHATSWOOD
 
 BURIED 25 October 1945 at Gore Hill Cemetery, NSW.
 
 FATHER John Leche Kraushaar (1819-1899)
 MOTHER Frances Jane Thurtell-Murray (1822-1902)
 
 MARRIED Rosa Ellen Downton (1864-1917) on 14 August 1884 at RG’s Office, Elizabeth St., Sydney, NSW. Consent of Rosa’s Guardian was given.
 Data 

NSW Marriage Record 1186/1884

KRAUSHAAR ALFRED &
DOWNTIN ROSA E
@ SYDNEY
 
 CHILDREN   Conrad Crawshaw (1885-1966)
Mignonette Kraushaar (1886-1969)
Percy Thorne Crawshaw (1889-1978)
Carey Crawshaw (1891-1980)
Beatrice Mary Kraushaar (1895-1963)
Eva Lucy Kraushaar (1897-1977)
Winifred Rose Kraushaar (1900-1942)
Jessie Gwendoline Kraushaar (1902-1968)
Alfred B. Kraushaar (1904-1906)
Hazel May Kraushaar (1907-1976)


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Called Allie by his mother. Was first sent to school in Stratford-upon-Avon.

Alfred is listed in the 1881 British census as Alfred Kraushaar, a chemist’s apprentice, age 20 and born in Ketton, Rutland, England. He is living with his parents and sister, Grace B. Kraushaar, age 16, who was born in Ketton, Rutland, England. They are living with their father, John L. Kraushaar, with a dwelling at Hunters Lodge and the census place as Clayhidon, Devon, England.

Migrated to Australia, arriving on 1 December 1881 on SS Cotopaxi. In Australia, he initially worked on wharves (earned £5 per week) and as a window dresser for Anthony Horden's store, and then as a salesman.

In 1883 Alfred Kraushaar appears to have defaulted on a deal to buy a business. Perhaps he received word that Mary Downton was dying. On 29 November 1883, while living at 406 Elizabeth Street, he paid two pounds each for Rosa E Downton aged 19 Domestic & Annie J Hartnell aged 23 of South Street Street Wellington Somerset, for their trip on the SS Abergeldie which left England on 13 May 1884. Alfred married Rosa about a month after her arrival. He was identified as crockery salesman on the marriage certificate.

In 1893-4 Alfred owned a 3-acre farm with cottage. Was this related to Con’s attendance at Camden Grammar School?

Grandson MALC recalls:

Grandfather K bought a goat because (I was told) his daughter Hazel had asthma and Jessie had eczema, and were allergic to cow’s milk. Then he started to breeding goats at his property Ferns Hollow at 516 Mowbray Rd, Lane Cove West, even importing some special type from Switzerland, and became known as The Goat King.

In early years, the family moved house frequently (son Con reported living in 15 different houses before his marriage). Sands directories give some details.

Grandfather (AK) at age 85 used to walk on a bush track from his house in Mowbray Rd to the tram at Lane Cove. He said My legs are still pretty good.

A Kraushaar & Sons

The origin of the family confectionery business is not clear. RHC thought it was acquired from Scheerers. Evidence for this is the sale by Scheerers of cheap confectionery at 592 George St Sydney in 1891. By the 1894 edition of Sands Directory, A Kraushaar is a confectioner at 594 George St. The photo suggests that 592 and 594 are essentially the same address, with 592 providing access to the upstairs luncheon rooms. (SMH of 27 Oct 1906 confirms Kraushaar phone no was Central 4737.) In 1895 AK was advertising himself as a wholesale confectioner with an address in Newtown.

The business expanded to 9 shops in Sydney. The business name was changed to Crawshaw in 1916 because of attacks on the shops during W War 1. The business must have been successful, but there is no evidence that Alfred or his sons made more than a modest living.

A newspaper clipping shows that Alfred was operating a fruit shop at 58 Willoughby Rd, Crows Nest in 1920. Perhaps he worked on the north shore of Sydney and left his sons to work the sweet shops on the south side.



Alfred, Rosa & family, c1908.


Daily Telegraph, 1902.




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