Wesley Tom

(1837—1898)



 BORN 16 August 1837 at Vale Flat, opposite Orton Park, NSW.
 Data 

NSW Birth Record 
V18371932 162A/1837.

TOM WESLEY
WILLIAM & ANN
 DIED 18 June 1898 at 7 Mecklenburgh St, St Pancras, England.
 
 FATHER William Tom (1791-1883)
 MOTHER Ann Lane (1796-1870)
 
 MARRIED Louise Platt

Studied Law — Sydney University records him as receiving BA in 1860.

London University archives show Wesley as studying Intermediate Laws in 1869. Archives of the Middle Temple, London, show Wesley Tom, of Bathurst, NSW, (23) eighth son of William T. senr., of Bathurst, NSW, esq was called to the bar on 26 January 1865. The Law Magazine indicates that this call was after Wesley had passed exams in 1864.

Said to have married late in life in England. Wife was possibly Louise Emma Platt b.1868 in Marylebone.

Advertisement in The Australasian says that Wesley died in October 1898 in his 60th year. This is confusing but comes from the family of James who died in August 1898.

Probate granted to Widow Louise Platt, assets £2881/10/1

Wesley wrote from England:

In every community the number of persons engaged in study, or really sympathising with such pursuits is but a small fraction of the whole; but in Australia, the numbers of such persons is almost infinitesimally small. Most who are there to dig for gold, either literally or metaphorically, and as soon as they are satisfied they hasten to other countries, where money may be spent to more advantage. So much is this the case that men are often spoken of as public benefactors, merely for staying in the place after their fortune is made. Some stay for health sake, or on account of domestic ties; but this last probably induces as many to go. Thus in society generally, the student meets with but comparatively little sympathy; sometimes, indeed, he feels a kind of antipathy towards him; for men, devoted entirely to making money and accustomed to consider this as the chief good, look somewhat with suspicion on pursuits which seems to them not to have any very direct or immediate bearing on the same object, and a shrug of the shoulders is really felt more discouraging than open and declared war.

   


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