William Glasson

(1811—1889)



 BORN 16 April 1811 at Trevena Farm, Breage, Cornwall, England.
 CHRISTENED 23 June 1811 at Breage.
 DIED 6 September 1889 in Blayney, NSW.
 Data 

NSW Death Record 8095/1889

GLASSON WILLIAM
JOHN & MARY
@ BLAYNEY
 
 
 FATHER John Glasson (1771-1856)
 MOTHER Mary Glasson (1783-1855)
 
 MARRIED Susan Russell (1811-1895) on 6 October 1836 in Sithney, Cornwall.
 CHILDREN   Richard Glasson (1837-1895)
William Glasson (1839-1923)
Susan Reed Russell Glasson (1842-1922)
Robert Glasson (1843-1916)
James Russell Glasson (-1890)
John Glasson (-1920)
Mary Annie Margaret Glasson (1850-1930)
Lucy Elizabeth Glasson (1853-1902)


♦♦♦

Born in Cornwall and emigrated to Australia on 3 February 1852 with wife and most children. J.P. Of Holwood, Blayney

Donated most of the cost of building Blayney Wesleyan Methodist Church with the foundation stone laid by his wife Susan.

Obituary

The late Mr. William Glasson whose death took place on Friday, was born on the 16th April, 1811, at Tremearne, Beage, Cornwall, England, and in 1836 he married Miss Susan Russell, of Tithney Green, of the same county, by whom, with five sons and three daughters, he is survived.

In February, 1852, he arrived in Sydney and shortly afterwards removed to the Western District, settling down with his family at Guyong, and subsequently residing at Cornish Settlement and Woodside. In 1859 he purchased land at King’s Plains, near Blayney, and here he resided until the time of his death. Being amongst the pioneers of the West, Mr. Glasson met with many difficulties incident to the early settlement of the colony, but by perseverance and energy he succeeded in amassing a competency. His sons, with one exception, are engaged in grazing pursuits, three of them being settled in the Blayney district, and another near Yass. The other son, Rev. William Glasson, is an acceptable minister in the Wesleyan Methodist connection, and is now stationed at Armidale. Mr. Glasson has three brothers in the colony, Richard, Joseph and Henry, all of whom are still living in the West. His elder brother is now residing in New Zealand. The deceased gentleman was always a consistent member of the Wesleyan Church, and rendered valuable assistance to that cause. When first he went to reside at Blayney, there being no place of worship, he opened his house for preaching purposes, and here services were conducted until the erection of a suitable building. Since that time two churches, the latter one of the handsomest buildings in the district, and a parsonage have been erected, and this has been accomplished mainly through the efforts of Mr. Glasson and his family. Thus it will be seen that in his death the church in that district will lose one of its principal supporters. He at one time took a very prominent part in public affairs, and was one of the most active in the movement which caused the Government to construct the railway to Bourke via Blayney. When the township was incorporated he accepted the appointment of Returning Officer. As a justice of the peace he was looked upon as a man of strict integrity and uprightness. He proved himself a true friend to many who were in distress, both by affording monetary assistance an valuable advice.

For some nine months prior to his demise he was a great sufferer. During the last month of his life he suffered intense agony, which he bore with Christian fortitude. As a proof of the respect and esteem in which he was held, there were present at his funeral on Sunday a large concourse of people, the funeral cortege extending for upwards of three quarters of a mile in length. All classes of the community in the Blayney district were represented, while in addition to these were personal friends of long standing from Bathurst, Orange, and other distant places. The funeral service was conducted by Rev. J. Tarn in the Wesleyan Church, the interior of the building being suitably draped in mourning. The officiating clergyman referred in fitting terms to the past life and labours of the deceased, and the procession being again formed the body was conveyed to the local cemetery for interment.

 —Bathurst Free Press & Mining Journal 10 Sep 1889


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